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we must defeat them at the polls. we must take november as our day and we mustçó rise of across america. we must tellçó america, we will not tolerate it anymore. we must feed them on our knees. -- we must defeat them on our knees. if god is for us, there is no abortionist in this place or in hell that can stand against us. all children, all babies, are worthy alike. god bless you, and god bless america. çó>> that is the way we were abe to put on these activities. we have a student contests program for essays and poland's for high school and junior high students. -- essays andñrÑi poems. we want to announce the winners of six of the categories. i am going to ask our students to come forward. Ñifirst will be our high school essay winner. >> i am from newardk, delaware. >> and our high school point winner. ñr>> i am from cincinnati, ohio. >> and our high school poster winter. >> i am from baltimore, maryland. >> and our junior high poem winner. >> i am fromÑi white plains, new york. >> and our junior high poster winner. >> i am from owens bill, ky. >> we are very proud of our stud
around the world. that is at 7 eastern on c- span's america and the courts. this is just about nine minutes. >> a year ago when i took office in the midst of the worst recession since the great depression, i promise you two things. the first was that there would be better days ahead, and the second was that the road to recovery would be long, and sometimes bumpy. that was brought home again yesterday when we learn that in november, our economy sought its first month of job gains in nearly two years. last month, we lost war that we gained. we know that no single month makes a trend, and job losses for the final quarter of 2009 or one-tenth of what they were in the first quarter. until we see the trend of good, sustainable job creation, we will be relentless in our efforts to put america back to work. that task goes deeper than replacing the 7 million jobs that have been lost of the past two years. we need to rebuild our economy so that families can feel some measure of security again. the stories i hear tell me that they have known their own private recession since long before econom
to find new markets, just as the competitors are finding. america is on the sidelines as the other -- if we are on the sidelines as other nations are doing this, we will lose jobs offshore. however, realizing the benefits also means enforcing those agreements to the trading partners so that will play by the rules. that is why i will continue to try to open global markets to strengthen the trade relations in asia and with partners like south korea, panama, and columbia. . and colombia. fourth, we need to invest in the skills and education of our people. now this year, this year we've broken through the stale mate between left and right by launching a national competition to improve our schools. and the idea here is simple. instead of rewarding failure, we only reward success. only reward success. in the status quo, we only invest in reform. reform that raises student achievement, inspiring students to compel in math and science, and turns around tailing -- failing school that steal the future of too many young americans from rural communities to the inner cities. in the 21st century
's tempting to look back on these moments and assume that our progress was inevitable, that america was always destined to succeed. but when the union was turned back at bull run and the allies first landed at omaha beach, victory was very much in doubt. when the market crashed on black tuesday and civil rights marches were beaten on bloody sunday, the future was anything but certain. these were the times that tested the courage of our convictions and the strength of our union and despite all our dwegses and -- divisions you and disagreements, our hesitations and our fears, america prevailed because we chose to move forward as one nation, as one people. again we are tested and again we must answer history's call. one year ago i took office amid two wars, an economy rocked by a severe recession, a financial system on the verge of collapse and a government deeply in debt. experts from across the political spectrum warned that if we did not act we might face a second depression. so we acted immediately and aggressively. and one year later the worst of the storm has passed. but the devastation rem
that our progress was inevitable that america was always destined to succeed. but when the union was turned back at bull run and the allies first landed at omaha beach victory was very much in doubt. when the market crashed on black tuesday and civil rights marches were beaten on bloody sunday, the future was anything but certain. these were the times that tested the courage of our convictions and the strength of our union and despite all our dwegses and -- divisions you and disagreements, our hesitations and our fears, america prevailed because we chose to move forward as one nation as one people. again we are tested and again we must answer history's call. one year ago i took office amid two wars an economy rocked by a severe recession, a financial system on the verge of collapse and a government deeply in debt. experts from across the political spectrum warned that if we did not act we might face a second depression. so we acted immediately and aggressively. and one year later the worst of the storm has passed. but the devastation remains. one in 10
of the forces for freedom and equality in america's second civil war. racism and segregation and depression of african-americans did not end with the end of the first civil war in 1865 and the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments. in the decades that followed, segregation, and the separation of races was enforced by law and by practice. slowly over the alt -- long years after the civil war, the inconsistencies of these policies, with the sacrifices made in the civil war, and the clear mandate in our declaration of independence that all men are created equal, for america to look into a mirror to see that the image of america that was in that mirror did not reflect the america we wanted, did not live up to the dreams our founding fathers had. we needed another civil war. this time not a violent one on the battlefield of virginia, but a war of ideas and of values, a war of protest to shatter that mirror, to shatter that image and create a new reflection of our hopes for a more perfect union. revolutions need leaders, leaders prepared as our founding fathers were, pledged their lives
not be manufacturing the way we are. that is about the only thing made in america still are . the number one thing may be that these are a bunch of stupid young kids remember when issue was to legalize marijuana. it is now legal in california and new jersey. you can now get in 1 ounce a month if you have cancer or aids. the drugs are not all horrible. most of the horrible drugs are manufactured by are pharmaceutical companies and people abuse them. guest: the drug issue is very complicated. it is supply and demand for it is one that neither the europeans or the americans or latin americans have been able to come to grips with are the drugs are having a big effect in latin america. this was not true 20 years ago. we will not resolve this overnight. we need to focus on the issue now that the mexican society is bleeding very badly. united states needs to be concerned about that. secretary of state clinton said this last year. host: a dealer is asking if cuba got an earthquake like haiti, would we be there to rebuild a communist regime? guest: that is an issue of helping out a country that has terrible pr
america's sake. this includes making sure these communities and people in them are coordinated effectively and held accountable at every level. meanwhile, the investigation into the christmas day incident continues, and we are learning more about the suspect. we know that he traveled to yemen, a cup project a country dealing with deadly insurgencies. -- a country dealing with deadly insurgencies. he was directed to attack that plane headed for america. this is not the first time this group has targeted us. they have bomb humani government facilities and our embassy in 2008, killing one american. i have made it a priority to strengthen our partnership with the yemeni government. even before christmas day, we have seen the results. plots have been disrupted and leaders eliminated. all those involved in the attempted act must know, you, too, will be held to account. it has been nearly a year since i stood on the steps of the u.s. capitol and took the oath of office as your president. with that 0 came the solemn responsibility i carry with me every moment of every day, the responsibility to pr
the public whether it is an america or britain or any other country in the world engaged in a balton that and then when there is an international crisis,-- and the only other thing i would say is that i think it is ultimately a point, whether people like me or the diplomats in the military in the end but ultimately they do finally have to make decisions, and i hope as a result of the totally understandable remaining divisions and difficulties over the policy in iraq that we don't put a future generation of leaders in the position where the really, really, really difficult decisions can be taken. >> thank you. i would like to thank our witness and in particular for agreeing to stay on for a much longer session then we had originally foreseen and thank you to everyone here in the brehm both this morning and this afternoon. i would like just to say a brief word about tomorrow. we are going to let gatt other important aspects of the ministerial and professional decision-making process on the rack and use resource in the capability of government departments to deliver their policy objecti
policy toward latin america with a political science professor. and then a conversation on the future of the hybrid and electric car industry. "washington journal" is next. . . . the president's efforts to give the economy on track. that is this morning from "the washington post." the report breaking this morning about a plane crashed in the route, "the new york times" online have the story about the airplane crashing near beirut in stormy weather. officials said that 82 passengers and eight crew members were on board. we will update the information as we get it. ruth, democratic line. caller: i am not quite sure if we ever did what we were promising. to try and help people who were in trouble with their mortgages. i think that we took the wrong approach to begin with. so many people that were out of their homes. the fact ripples through the economy. -- the of fact ripples through the economy. let's help -- bethe effedctct te riffles through the economy. if the loan was renegotiated to what it was really worth, they can afford it, but the communication that happening. ho
as america's capital of antisemitism. jews were discriminated for everything, houses, public accommodation, even service clubs and automobile clubs. the rest of america was not much better. that is one of the reasons why a record of america with an administration beloved by jews raised only a feeble voice against the holocaust. that was then. now, of course, the twin cities are among the most enlightened communities of america, the place where they have had several jewish senators, several black officials, a flourishing of the community. it has transformed itself as america has been transformed. and i want to ask the question, what happened? how did that happen? we do not have time to get into many of the reasons but the most significant was the powerful tide of the civil rights revolution. it simply knocked down a closed society of my youth, knocking down the walls of the segregation and discrimination, opening the doors of equal opportunity to blacks and jews and all but -- and ultimately to women and to gaze and to people with disabilities. martin luther king jr. was not the first or on
as america's capital of anti- semitism. jews were discriminated against in everything, housing, jobs, education, public examination, it even service clubs and automobile clubs. you can imagine how blacks were treated in that society. that is one of the reasons that the record of america, with an administration beloved by youths, raised only a feeble voice against the holocaust. that was then. now, of course, the twin cities are among the most dynamic cities in america, a place where they have jewish said as -- jewish senators, and dozens of black [unintelligible] i just want to ask the question what happened? how did that happen? lots of things. the most significant for me was the powerful ties of the civil rights revolution which knocked down the closed society of my youth, knocking down the walls of segregation and discrimination, smashing quotas and apartheid, opening the doors of equal opportunity to blacks and jews and, ultimately, to women, two days, and to persons of disabilities. -- to dagays, and to persons of disabilities. the and before him had the moral clout that martin
and assume that our progress was inevitable -- that america was always destined to succeed. but when the union was turned back at bull run and the allies first landed at omaha beach, victory was very much in doubt. when the market crashed on black tuesday and civil rights marchers were beaten on bloody sunday, the future was anything but certain. these were times that tested the courage of our convictions, and the strength of our union. and despite all our divisions and disagreements, our hesitations and our fears, america prevailed because we chose to move forward as one nation, and one people. again, we are tested. and again, we must answer history's call. one year ago, i took office amid two wars, an economy rocked çbyçi2oç severe recession, ai( financial system on the verge of collapse, and a government deeply in debt. çexperts from across the political spectrum warned that if we did not act, we might face a second depression. so we acted -- immediately and aggressively. and one year later, the worst of the storm has passed. but the devastation remains. one in ten american
., and the chairman and ceo of bmw north america. "washington journal" take your calls and e-mails live every morning here on c-span. . >> this is 50 minutes. >> good morning everybody. the a pleasure to welcome you here today. this is the first event we are having in our new conference room, and we hope to headache it a good one. i get to say a few words about the bipartisan policy center before we get into the real action. we were founded on the idea that people with significantly different views and who have strong allegiance to different parties could still come together and try to design serious and substantive solution toss address the nation's big challenges. we are not a think tank in the traditional sense. we only study things for a purpose. and when our projects come together, people understand they are going to spend as much time advocate fog a particular solution as constructing it. i think it's fair to say that the project we are launching today will very much test the proposition of bringing people together towards a substantive and detailed solution, and will test our ability to advoca
politicians in america there at that time. he knew i would be a political problem for them. he started making my life interesting. he was tickineting my car wherever i part. the attorney general investigated why the city police were tapping my office phones. it was a really frustrating time. i began to question why i got involved with government, why i even did this. i was doing a good job as a young attorney. i was thinking government was not the answer. this was a waste of my time. i was coming home that night. i was living in high-rise housing. the tenant president as i was walking home greeted me. she asked me what was wrong. i told her i did not have time, i just wanted to go home. she told me not to walk past year and to come give her a hug -- she told me not to walk past her and to give her a hug. [laughter] these are the times when you want to go home and go to bed. here i was hugging this woman. she asked me what was wrong. i was angry. i have vented on her a year of frustration. she is a woman of dignity. she is small but she is a figure you can look up to. she looked at me with her
or what? [applause] he also told us that our department would be leading the way in changing america's. we're doing just that. it is an inspiration to walk in here every day and work with all of you on the issues that are so important to all americans. it is an inspiration and honor every day to work for secretary salazar and serve the president. thank you mr. secretary for the opportunity to be here with you. [applause] >> thank you, laura. we have had a great 2009 and we are fired up and ready to go for 2010. i am fired up. are you? [applause] come on. [applause] our work truly has just begun. i want to say at the outset that it would not have battled been possible to do the great things we did in 2009 -- it would not have been at all possible to do the greatÑi things we did in 209 without the people in the department of the interior. i said i would not run for the governorship of colorado because i wanted to be with you. [cheers and applause] this department, as the custodian of america's natural resources, as the custodian of america's history, really does so much for the 300 million
to an excellent panel that's assembled here. and we thank our friends and colleagues from the new america foundation, which has been helping us put this event together and some subsequent ones still to come. i won't introduce the panel now. i would, however, like to say to congressman eelsen what a pleasure it is to see him back here at brookings. he has been a frequent visitor here, and we're the better for it. we look forward to listening to you this afternoon. i don't think i need to go on at too much length about jim's background. >> good. >> we'll just stop right there. he's come to talk to us about fencing this afternoon, a sport from his youth which he's taken up once again in middle age. >> early middle age. >> right. >> but in addition to being an athlete and an owe limpion, he has also been of course a global public servant. he was that in his capacity as the president of the world bank and then in 2005-2006, he was the special envoy for the quartet working on the middle east in general and the issues and challenges of gaza in particular. subsequent to that, as a brookings trust
-span's "america and the courts." n/a 524 decision, the supreme court struck down limits on contributing to political campaigns from corporations. anthony kennedy delivered the opinion. in it, he broke the government may not suppress political speech. a sufficient interest justifies political speech by nonprofit or for-profit opinions. shortly after the court announced its decision, floyd abrams, the attorney who argued on behalf of mitch mcconnell and citizens united president david bossie sport with reporters. >> i represented mitch mcconnell in the case and was one of the lawyers who argued it in the supreme court. this is an extraordinarily triumphant day. the court has ruled that corporations, unions, and all the rest of us may participate freely and openly and spend money on the electoral and political matters. this decision is a long time coming, and as the opinion of justice kennedy makes clear, it involves the reversal of two prior opinions, one involving senator mcconnell, one two years before. the core of it all is that the right to participate in, participate about and be hea
and is far less so now, as there are so many people in the muslim world that are mad at america. very few muslims hate americans for being americans. in terms of airports, the watch word is not a silver bullet. if anything, this gentleman in detroit was a rank amateur. had he been a professional, it would not have the nabobs of job. for americans to somehow think that we have a great system to protect them, i think that is wrong. i think sometimes i wonder why we spend so much attention on the aircraft and system when we have 3000 or 4,000 miles of open sea borders. host: going back to your comment from a moment ago about the u.s. killing al qaeda one of the time, what should we do, does that mean a bigger military presence in places like yemen? guest: we are at the drawing board. we have not progressed since 9/11. we are fighting an enemy that basically does not exist. the american people, for the last four presidents, continued to tell americans that we are fighting an enemy that is motivated by hatred for freedom and our liberties. women in the workplace. liquor after the work day. the
with you. i want to talk about what you do for america and also what america needs to do for all of you. from day one this has been a mission of mine, along with the vice president's i wife, dr. jill biden, my dear, dear friend and blue star mom herself, who has been a tireless advocate in support of our extraordinary national guard and reserve members and their families, jill and i have been working hard on this. one of the first things that we wanted to do was to first listen and learn. so with many of you we had a series of round table discussions -- roundtable discussions, thank you-all with our military spouses. we met with deborah and sandy and other wives of the joint chiefs to get their advice and guidance on how to develop our initiatives. that was incredibly helpful. we also met with the senior enlisted advisors wives to discuss what's working in the ranks and what also can be improved. these conversations gave jill and i just really critical guidance and insight for what would be our subsequent visits to bases and military communities around the country. and as i think back o
and we will talk to jason deparle about poverty in america and the economy. from the nation's capital, this is " washington journal." host: the supreme court ruled 5- 4 to allow corporations to spend as much as the want to support or oppose individual candidates. the ruling is likely to also allow labor unions to send unlimited funds. the justices kept in place, though, a century old ban on corporate donations directly to any one candidate. let us kickoff today's " washington journal" talking about the supreme court decision. the phone lines -- send us a tweet at c-spanwj or e-mail us at journal@c-span.org. "the washington post" on this story. the court also overturned a ban on corporations and unions airing campaign ads in the 30 days before primary and 60 days before a general election. also in "the washington post" this morning they talk about the reaction on capitol hill. inside "the washington post" its quotes senator charles schumer -- bound to push for new restrictions on corporate political spending, including limits for companies with government contracts, sharehold
available or digital audio download or so. -- are sold. . . estes is c-span's "america and the courts." next, presentations from the week of the supreme court's special. first, william suter and his job, and how the supreme court decides to take cases. >> what are redoing today? >> we have a session in court this morning, announcing the orders from last week's conference, and we have the announcement of two opinions. and removing the admission of the attorneys to different groups. largely, today was a ceremonial day. this is the morning coat. it is a very traditional outfit. here in court, it is worn by the marshall of the court and myself and also the solicitor general of the united states and his staff where it while they argue cases here. some of the women in the staff do not with a code. -- where the coach. one of the women here is a deputy, and she wears it herself. we traditionally wear it when the court is in public, wearing robes. so when we are upstairs, and at the inauguration of the president. so it is very traditional. years and years and years ago, all atto
to the united states of america throughout its history. haiti sent troops to fight with the american patriots who were fighting for their innocence against great britain and -- independence against great britain. in savannah, the battle of savannah, many haitians lost their lives which was one of the turning points of the columnists turning the tide against the british army. many valiant haitians died for our independence and actually during history when haitian military had a 12-year war with napoleon's army, haiti defeated the great napoleon's military and therefore france was in need of finances and france at that time controlled the louisiana territory. it was because of haiti's defeat of france and their need for cash that the united states was able to buy the louisiana territory, the same as the louisiana purchase, which therefore opened the west to the united states and louis and clark then went throughout the continent. so if you look at it, haiti has had a tremendous amount to do with our development as a nation and so we now owe a responsibility and i believe to our long-standing fr
. what is our policy currently in latin america and how different is it from the bush administration? >> we really don't have a policy to latin america. that is not a fault of the obama administration. the euna states needs universal bilateral policies in certain regions. there are many long past policies for the night states -- the united states need to direct -- differentiate among different countries in the hemisphere. we have different priorities now. we are slow in washington on the hill and in the white house to come to that understanding. host: what is the political landscape in latin america? how has the landscape changed politically down there? guest: there is a much more diverse ideological group of countries such as venezuela and ecuador and bolivia which are not very friendly to the united states or to the market economy. on the other hand, we have a prpragmatic president likelula in central america. we have the problem of cuba and we have a terrible problem with haiti. host: on the issue of haiti, there is an article about a question of commitment and can the united stat
in america i would rather be living in with having lost this job in texas, because i know that the programs that you all have put in place, i'll be able to find that job very soon. and that's the type of can-do spirit that you see in the state of texas. we lead the nation in the production -- in the development of jobs. while america was losing 3 million jobs because of the washington type of spend it all, spend it now approach. texas was gaining almost 100,000 jobs. just this last november, and october. we created jobs in the state of texas. that's what people want to see. low taxes, a regulatory climate that's fair and a school workforce. they picked texas as the number three place in america for small businesses. that came out two days ago. creating that environment for people to have a job. single most important thing a governor will do. >> governor, and by the way 100,000 jobs you said you create under your administration but we lost well beyond that amount, correct? >> no, sir. we created more jobs from november of 2007 to november of 2008. texas created more jobs than the rest of the
little rock. nebraska road graders made in north america will have a north little rock tag on it. and the future of our country -- we will have a current -- census. by the middle of the century of looks like we will be pushing somewhere in the neighborhood of a half a billion folks spirit are tracked -- billion folks. we are excited about the innovation the administration is looking at in terms of reprivatizing funding. . >> thank you, thanks for all your leadership in arkansas. as i said, the president, vice- president and other members of the cabinet will be making some announcements about high-speed rail. there have been some very strong proposals from many different regions around the country on high-speed rail. high-speed rail is coming to america and is coming to america because of the $8 billion, which is a billion times more than we have ever had at dot because of president obama's vision and vice-president biden's vision on this. they have that inserted in the economic recovery plan because they know that is what americans want. i think when you see the role out of the h
to america by the end of the year. but i don't think he did enough for us who are unemployed. he gave no remarks, no speech, anything about helping us who are running out of unemployment. he did not talk about helping us to extend these unemployment benefits for all of us who are running out. a lot of us will become homeless. host: what caller: did you do i was a maintenance engineer. host: he focused a lot on it jobs -- and what are you worried about? good luck. next, antonio, an independent. caller: yes, i want to say something about mr. obama last night. the speech was mediocre, same song. i hope the people in this country realize the condition this country is in. forget the war, there is one song in italia that says [ quality and italian words] -- america is a beautiful country. no one can beat us, and if we want we can do. we need to thrive these things going on in the washington for so many years. they don't care for the everyday people. host: antonio says words, words, words. there is a project at the university that keeps all kinds of statistics on presidential speeches. about
the democracy journal. now i would like to introduce philip longman of the new america's foundation. >> [inaudible] so i'm going to talk about the american veterans experience with agent orange, and before i do i just want to say right off that despite my appearance and actually a little too young to have been in the vietnam war. i missed it by a year, so i say that so nobody will confuse me with a draft doctor or a vietnam veteran who's got attitude. if i go into a rage i'm doing it on behalf of veterans, not because i am one. the other somewhat complicating factor for me today is as paul mentioned i am the author of this book, "best care anywhere why the v.a. health care is better than yours." and i have ownership of that book. it's coming out in a second edition. i still stand by what it says, which essentially is the va, despite its mixed reputation, has undergone a quality revolution that has a lot to teach about reforming the rest of the health care system. thank you. but the va does have problems, and when it comes to agent orange, many of those problems are very revealed, an
works in haiti, but if we do nothing, in 10 years one of every $5 in the united states of america will be spent on health care. and in 30 years one of every $3 will be spent on health care in the united states of america. that is unsustainable. that is an unsustainable road for us to go down and people will then look 10 years from now and 20 years from now and 30 years from now and they'll ask, who was representing western pennsylvania when they had a chance to tackle health care reform? who was representing connecticut? who was representing northeast ohio? when the bell rang to step up and make these changes. i yield to my friend from western p.a. >> i thank the gentleman and i thank him for his kind words as well. he hit the nail right on the head, madam speaker. that we, i think it's appropriate today to take a look at what was happening one year ago today. a year ago today the budget deficit was forecast by the congressional budget office for the fiscal year ending september 30, 2009, to be $1.8 trillion. the jobs that were lost in the month of january were more than 700,000 j
, it jobs, securing america. we also spent time with leaders like bill clinton, talking about the tragedy in haiti. spent time with leaders like bill clinton, talking about the tragedy in haiti but i must tell you, we just had a powerful, sensible wind blown beneath our wings by bill clinton, former president of the united states. to start this conference off with another president, eric schmidt from google, to hear from the president of the united states, barack obama and to have been between more than a dozen presidents in ceo's of business and labor come before us and tell us of their optimism and their belief that we can get this done i believe the leaves are members ready to go back to work next week. we are prepared to take the words of bill clinton, barack obama, eric schmidt into with the people of america have been waiting for and that is for us to pass health care legislation, to put americans back to work and to have sensible policy on energy and to bring this forward in foreign policy as well and we heard from our leaders, principally from the speaker of the house of represent
have a dream it's going to happen. and i know when the president told america eight different times on television that we're going to have all these negotiations on c-span. i know some day we're going to have all those negotiations on c-span. i have been trying to find out where the negotiations are going on so that we can have some true transparency and just -- and it was a great idea when the president said it. so that people all over the country can see who's negotiating for them and who's negotiating for the pharmaceuticals, who's negotiating for the insurance companies, who's negotiating for the plaintiffs' lawyers and aarp and standing on the side of the retired folks. we work able to see all of that. it would be transparent. the president, when i heard him saying that over and over again on television throughout the presidential campaign, i thought that's not a bad idea, that's a good idea. we'll make this totally transparent. even though i'm a republican, the president had a good idea. we have to give him fault, too. once he got elected, we need him to follow through and the
. there are holding hundreds of events encumbrances across america to celebrate -- all across; american to celebrate lincoln. he spoke about equality. as we all know from our history, our entire went after the invention of the cotton in jim prada -- after the cotton gin. families were torn apart and sold. abraham lincoln's rise to the white house paralyzed the tension in america over slavery. by 1854, the republican party was formed to oppose slavery and then spent in the territories. by 1858, lincoln himself warned that a house divided could not stand. like most leaders, lincoln could see but could do little to slow the downward spiral of our union. six weeks after his election in november 1860, the union was dissolved and [unintelligible] the war claimed more american lives than all other wars that we have been involved in. between 1861 and 1865, 620,000 americans died in battle or by disease. this was 2% of the entire u.s. population at the time, the equivalent of 6 million americans today. it is difficult to imagine the full weight of the burden that abraham lincoln treated during his time as we
industries in america endorsing the bill, the steelworkers, ellen and -- aluminum workers, and others, we are trying to build a coalition that will be able to sustain the question of whether or not we're helping or hurting american industry. on the senate side, lindsay is leading the effort to get 68 votes over there. there'd doing a great job to accomplish that goal. we are looking forward to him as the leader completing legislation over there, and he and i have been talking all along towards final completion of legislation, but i do not think our goal is inconsistent. it is to affect -- protect the american economy, reduce the amount of pollution by 2% over the next 40 years or so, while backing out imported oil and protecting the health of our country. we agree on the larger goals. we can work of the details and accomplish all of it because it cannot happen if we do not have bipartisan support for the legislation, so i am looking forward to working with lindsay. >> are the pieces falling into place for energy legislation? >> i would like to acknowledge that collins is on a cap and its
the economy. he brought of the fear of the soviet empire and the cold war. america became focused on a different set of problems in the economy. this will turn the public's attention to other issues. the he will talk about running government a more efficiently. that is the same thing that president clinton did with the reinventing america. this president came in asking vice president biden to have a task force. we will go back to that. we will have the middle class task force. we need to see that they are dealing with the problems of the middle class. what you will see is that the focus will be on the environment. this is an administration focusing on ways to move our dependence on foreign oil. we are talking about solar projects, a wind projects. we are looking to use federal dollars. we will talk about how this is creating real jobs. they will be talking about education. the education money will not be subject to the non entitlement money. they have to lift people's spirits and say that this is a ministration is going forward with a very positive initiatives in spite of the setb
someone very dear to massachusetts, and to america. senator ted kennedy was a tireless and big-hearted public servant, and for most of my lifetime was a force like no other in this state. [applause] his name will always command the affection and respect by the people a massachusetts and i said to be filled the same about her. there's no replacing a man like that, but tonight i honor his memory, and i pledge my very best to be a worthy successor. i said at the very beginning, when i sat down at the dinner table with my family, that win or lose we would run a race which would make us all proud. i kept my word and we ran a clean, issues oriented, upbeat campaign - and i wouldn't trade that for anything. when i first started running, i asked for a lot of help, because i knew it was going to be me against the machine. i was wrong, it was all of us against the machine. tonight we have shown everybody now and that you of the machine. i'm glad my mom and dad, brothers, sisters, and so many family members are here tonight. once again, before i go any further, i want to introduce somebod
, they want an end to abortion in america. i'm not going to say whether they're right or wrong but i'll point out, when the republicans were in charge, the senate, the house, the white house, the supreme court, once again, they did nothing to help pat robertson's followers accomplish what they wanted. tonight i ask those people, the christian right what about your own pact with the devil? how has that worked out with you -- out for you? i yield back the rest of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields his time. the gentleman from nebraska. mr. fortenberry. the gentleman from california, mr. dreier. the gentleman from louisiana, mr. cao. five minutes. mr. cao: yes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cao: thank you very much. mr. speaker, the new orleans saints are going to the super bowl for the first time in franchise history. as their representative to congress, i want to congratulate them in an official manner by acknowledging words of encouragement from constituents on the house floor. sunday's historic win was an inspiration to the rest of new orleans who contin
president. there are people that have added a great deal to america's history that have had idiosyncracies. they have not been of a damaging type. maybe from time to time, unpleasant or irascible. >> you're talking about hyman rickover and john mccain? >> john mccain is a friend of mine. i cannot say about him. i met rickover one time. i think it would fit with him, yes. >> the perceive any kind of role for congress to play? do you think it would be too late by the defense authorization bill to deal with it? do you have any plans to write any legislation on that? >> we will have our hearing wednesday and i hope you come at 10:00 a.m. i am sure all the members of the committee will probe this issue. there may be our requirement at the end of the day to have legislation. we can actually do it by a stand-alone bill. if that is the case, we can include in the defense authorization bill -- which will come out in may or later in the spring -- i do not think we should rush to judgment, because, honestly, i think it is not just the third is -- jurisdiction of those in power in the military, or sta
immediately. jobs here in america. we think that's very important. it also tries to help states so they're not laying off teachers and policemen and firemen. we think that's very important as well. let me say something. i did a little -- i get a little confused, and perhaps these facts are not well-known to you, but i thought i'd remind you of these facts. we pursued an economic program that your party put forward from 2001, 2003 on for eight years. now, while the people gave us the majority in the house and senate in 2006, obviously president bush threatened to or did in fact veto any changes that we made in economic policy . that economic policy, which you were a very strong supporter of and your party was a very strong supporter of, you continue to mention jobs. so i want to make sure you know these statistics. in the last three months of the brucks under the economic poll -- bush administration under the economic policies that not only did you pursue then but you still want to pursue because in fact the proposals that you have made essentially mirror the proposals that were made in
and intelligence, law enforcement, and security committees have the tools they need to keep america statesafe. the investigation into the christmas day incident continues. we're learning more about the suspect. we know that he traveled to yemen, a country grappling with poverty. we know that this group and all canada in the iranian peninsula trained him -- and al qaeda in the arabian peninsula trained him. in recent -- and al qaeda in th e iranian peninsula trained him. even before christmas day, we have seen the results. training camps have been struck and leaders eliminated. all those involved in the attempted attack on christmas, they must know, you, too, will be held on account. with my oath came the solemn responsibility that i carry with me every moment of every day, the responsibility to protect the safety and security of the american people. on that day, i also made a clear path our nation is at war with [unintelligible] we will do whatever it takes to defeat them, even as leopold the values that has always distinguished america among nations. make no mistake. that is exactly what we
of the communications workers of america and what the federal government's role should be an expanding communication in the communication that is on c-span 2. now president barack obama on the legacy of martin luther king jr. he commemorated the birthday of the late civil rights leader yesterday. president barack obama spoke at the historic thurmont avenue baptist church in the nation's capital where dr. king once preached. his remarks are about half an hour. [applause] >> good morning. praise be to god. let me begin by thanking the entire of vermont avenue baptist church family for welcoming our family here today. it feels like a family. thank you for making us feel that way. [applause] to pastor wheeler, first lady wheeler, thank you for welcoming us today. congratulations to jordan denice aka cornelius. [laughter] michelle and i have been blessed with a new nephew this year. austin lucas robinson. maybe at the appropriate time we can make introductions. [laughter] if jordan's father is like me, that will be about 30 years. [laughter] that is a great blessing. michelle and melia and sasha and i ar
, massachusetts, dee dee on the independent line. caller: good morning, american. -- america. i'm an independent who voted for scott brown and i responded to his message pretty much of stop the madness. what i'm seeing now is really frightening me because as soon as he won, you saw the big machines starting to move into place -- the media machines, political machines. you see late night talk-show host trashing him and making fun of him, and those clips being replayed over and over. give the man a chance. i think the people of massachusetts responded to this message and as soon as his message, stop the madness, got him elected now you see people putting spin. the republican leadership trying to exploit his win, the democratic leadership reviling his win and trying to explain it away. you see all the pundits -- it letterman, olbermann, and the republican side, glenn beck, making fun of them. give him a chance, i am pleading with people. thank you so much. go, scott brown. host: "the new york times" reported that john boehner has hired a former top adviser to the house republicans in 1994, barry ja
was taped in december 2009. >> this week, the president of the communication workers of america, larry cohen. also, the senior editor with telecommunications reports. briefly give us a snapshot of the communication workers of america. >> 700,000 women and men at work in the communications field. it could be broadcasting or journalism. we also have several hundred thousand retired members to remain active in many ways. we are in every state, with 10,000 in canada, including the canadian broadcasting company. >> what companies do they work for? >> about 1000 different companies, companies like at&t, general electric, verizon, comcast, "the new york times," and all the news agencies. >> when it comes to policy matters, what are some of the major areas of concern that you concentrate on? >> obviously communications policy is huge for us. health-care policy has become huge, because no matter where our members work, a great concern about what the future will be. we obviously support health care reform, but what does that mean? organizing rights is a big problem in the united states. the global eco
worldwide, 71,000 employed in north america. that translates to about 90 plants worldwide. we also read in the "wall street journal" that ford is to begin hiring at new, lower wages. guest: basically, we have a contract with the uaw. we are building a new vehicle in chicago, new people coming into the company. the idea to be competitive is to build things in the u.s., to build them well, otherwise, it will threaten manufacturing. the big story is we will be building a new vehicle in chicago. host: do you see a lot more jobs coming in the future? guest: right now, we need to protect the jobs that we have. we are working on our plan for the next few years, but it is always about being competitive. that is something we are striving to stay on top of. host: first phone call for susan cischke th. caller: my question has to do with the economics. it seems there is too much focus on the price of gas and not enough on the actual cost of the car. i would like to make a suggestion to all the companies. come off with a single seater commuter car. hopefully, it can be priced around $6,000. if you l
>> all this week on c-span, and look inside america's highest court. we spoke with the nine supreme court justices about the role in the history of the supreme court. coming up next, our interviews with associate justices antonin scalia and ruth bader ginsburg. and a look at the life of abraham lincoln. . . he talks about how the court to reaches decisions on cases and the attorneys to come before the court. we spoke with him in the east conference room in the supreme court building. >> antonin scalia , would you explain what the role and responsibilities of a justice this? >> to try to come out of the right way on cases that the court has agreed to hear. also, and this is the only respect which the job differs from an appeals judge, to decide on what cases the court should agree to hear. essentially, there are two functions. you have to decide what to put on our docket. secondly, what is on their docket to try to get it right. >> what role do you see the supreme court playing in society today? has it changed over your tenure? >> it is the same role that has always played. i do not
. until you understand that the america we occupy is the product, to a huge extent, of people who are still living -- think about it this way. someplace between 33% to 40% of today's gross domestic product comes out of firm that did not exist in 1980. now, i think if every economist who advises government had that tattooed there, 40% of the g.d.p. comes from firms that didn't exist 30 years ago, we'd have different policy. >> steven douglas. at the university level where we're teaching our college students about starting companies and assessing risks and calculating risks, should entrepreneurship education be, well, education or more experience? >> frank? >> if i may. i think the experience is the education. i will answer it very simply. you have to experience what it is to be an entrepreneur. in many places, stanford, m.i.t., for example, wisconsin, the institute in akron, we're doing the same. we take teams of students and we expose them to problems. in our case we have teams including an m.b.a. student, shadowing orthopedic surgeons, looking at the things they are doing. to det
in the white house just focused on manufacturing, because it is my view that america's got to make things. [applause] not all the manufacturing jobs that have gone are going to come back. and if people tell you they are, that's just not true -- because a lot of that has moved to places where the wages are just much lower. and i know that some people say, well, then we should just set up tariffs so that folks can't ship them in. but these days the economy, the global economy is so interconnected that that's just not a practical solution. the solution is to find -- and i don't know the details of the steel mill here -- but i know that the ones that have been successful, they do what emc is doing as well, which is you find what's the high- end market. what's the market that involves a lot of technology, specialization, highly trained workers, quick turnarounds to spec so that the customers really feel like they're getting something special and different -- that's how you compete, so finding ways to develop specialty steels and so forth, that's going to be the key. our manufacturing office wi
and the democratic party. and i think it is a really good thing that america is waking up, that they are seeing through this because of the tyrannical dictatorships, the way that nancy pelosi and harry reid are trying to push through this against the will of the american people. but if mr. brown loses the election, jamming down health care down the throats of the american people is nothing compared to what they are going to do. they will find some crisis, some way that they will continue to keep the power and before we know it we will have a hammer and sickle for a flag over the white house. host: on the republican line, joining us from san francisco. caller: good morning. it is a wonderful morning when we can have massachusetts, a historical state, help us, the american people to fight back what we see here. we have been so betrayed, we feel. the nation is in a mess. we all know what happened when we went into this financial crisis. we know that president clinton put out a lot -- that he change what existed in the banking system. and there he put in larry summers to deregulate everything. that
and to be dean of the school public service as we down here in texas work to prepare america's newest greatest generation for service to the country. host: come back again, ambassador. we will have coverage of the state of the union address beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. we will take a look back at past state of the union addresses. around a 30 5:00 p.m. eastern the state of the union procedures would get under way. the house speaker nancy pelosi will call the house to order. -- at around 8:35 p.m. then around a few minutes before 9:00 p.m. the first lady and others are escorted into the gallery. the gop response will be with the newly inaugurated bob macdonald. learning lessons from last year's response from then- governor, republican gov. bob region will -- from the floor of the virginia house of delegates run by an audience of about 350 that includes small business owners, legislators, and military members. coverage as well of gop response. thanks for watching. . . [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of represent
bernanke and the chairman of the federal reserve, i think we'd be looking at a very different america today. now he was not my choice to become the chairman of the federal reserve. the previous administration nominated ben bernanke. i voted for him. and then when i became chairman of the banking committee in january of 2007, for the first time, i went through a very frustrating year on that committee. on february 7 of 2007, i had my first hearings on the issue of the mortgage crisis in the country. and we had 12 such hearings on that committee over the remaining months. almost one every month on this issue. yet, i could not get the chairman of the federal reserve to pay as much attention as i thought he should have. beginning in the latter part of 2007, and going forward, his leadership in my view was absolutely critical to avoiding the kind of problems this country faced. so, mr. president, i'll speak for a few more minutes later in this tee baivment but i think we would make a great error, indeed, if we were to reject this nomination. we'd not terminate this filibuster, vote up and down o
's campaign. what we have a first amendment to allow people the right to speak out in america. why do we need people of courage. sometimes people to sacrifice their lives, whether those in the midst of board today were those who sacrificed their lives in america through other causes. why sometimes those things are necessary for us to have the comforts of sitting here today and having this discussion. so when whitney talk about dr. king, it is important to reflect on all of those issues, why we needed it, why we needed such a sacrifice then and why we need even more sacrifices today. so i will leave with this proposition. all of us obviously have to adhere to it, but i especially challenge those of the next generation that are in the audience. the issue is, yes, we're honoring dr. king. but i think what is even more significant from where we stand today is to give proper honor. the proper honor to days to question what movement are you going to be a part of? what movement are you going to lead? we are beset in this country in this world with as many problems that existed then, and they need to
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